INFOGRAPHIC: Locavorism vs. Globavorism

Does Locavorism Really Have the Impact on our Cities That We Think?
What happens to tomato lovers living in the U.S. when the fall hits, and the last few heirloom beauties disappear from the market for a couple of weeks? If you’re one of these people, do you then turn to a winter vegetable, and substitute in beets or parsnips in your dinner rotation, adding onions to salads and sandwiches instead? Or do you wait until the new tomatoes begin to show up in the market again, strangely enough about October or November, making their way thousands of miles from places like Mexico and Chile?
Farm to table has been a big deal up here in Portland and elsewhere, and for a lot of good reasons. When you take a look at the locavore movement, which dictates that one shouldn’t eat food that has been culled from outside of a 100-mile radius (in many cases, while other locavores are even more strict in their sourcing limitations), you can see the positive impact that it can have on a community. Take a look at this handy infographic, and compare the two styles of eating: locavorism versus globavorism.
Beginner’s Guide to Being a Locavore vs. a Globavore
Locavorism Globavorism Infographic
[Infographic Via: MNN]

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